Our Advice

We are lucky to live in a county with a diverse array of wildlife and many breeds of domestic animals in our homes, therefore, our on-call team spend many hours training with animal specialists, emergency services and veterinary practices to ensure their skills are well drilled and action ready. But most members of the public will need some advice to ensure that the animals requiring our help, receive the correct care for the best outcome.

Cats

Selection of cats on white background
Domesticated Cats

Whether your cat stuck in a tree, in a wall cavity, underground or stuck on a roof-top, the first thing to remember is to keep calm. Animals are known to sense when we are anxious or scared. In these situations, it is best to place food close by and clear the area. Whilst it can be difficult leaving your pet in distress, the animal is more likely to bring itself to safety whilst no one is present. Our advice is to contact our emergency telephone line immediately and remove yourself from the area until our team arrives. Under no circumstance should anyone attempt a rescue and risk serious injury to themselves, if you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.

Feral Cats

When seeing a feral cat or colony, the first reaction to most is to place food close by. In most cases, this is how the cat has come to be in the area and can often escalate a situation by drawing more animals to the area. We advise that feeding feral cats should only be done in serious cases of malnutrition of illness and the animal should be reported immediately. There are many organisations that tend to feral cats and many local rescues that actively help these animals in need. Our team continues it works to help these animals in need and actively play a part in the recovery and rehoming of feral cats within Cambridgeshire. If you find a feral colony or single cat, please contact our on-call telephone line to report the animal’s location. Under no circumstances should you approach the animal or attempt to capture the animal yourself. Attempting to capture the animal can cause great levels of stress and this task should be left to trained persons from reputable rescue centres and organisations.

Dogs

Advice on feral or domestic dogs, please ask if you need assistance
Domesticated Dogs

Dogs play a big part in many of our lives and are often the best friend to many of us. Occasionally they can find themselves in situations that most wouldn’t dream of. From running into badger sets, chewing into floor boards, hiding under buildings to finding themselves stuck in fencing, they can find themselves in dire need of help. In any situation that poses risk to yourself, contact our team for further assistance and remember that all dogs should be handled with the upmost care and attention when in rescue situations. Any dog has the potential to be dangerous and when finding themselves in these situations, can often display defensive or aggressive behaviour. Under no circumstance should anyone attempt a rescue and risk serious injury to themselves, if you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.

Stray Dogs

Under Law, any stray dog must be reported to the local authority. In many cases, dogs become lost when walking with owners or escaping from the residence, therefore, you can make reasonable effort to locate the owners close by. When dogs stray from their home or owners, it can be a terrifying ordeal and result in their natural protective instincts to appear and it is vital that you remember that any dog has the potential to cause harm or injury, especially when faced with situations instilling fear or anxiety. Should you find a stray dog, report it to the local authority immediately, in emergency situations our on-call team can be contact for further support and advice or alternatively, you can contact your local Police Constabulary for assistance. We advise that you do not approach the animal yourself but simply secure the animal in a safe place if able to do so. If you should manage to secure a friendly stray, transporting them to the closest veterinary practice, this will enable the local authority to collect the animal and give the veterinary team to opportunity to locate the owners themselves.

Horses & Cattle

General Advice for Horses

Horses are heavy and dangerous animals that often find themselves in dangerous situations. Many horses have excellent and secure paddocks to live their lives safely, however, many horses reside close to waterways and ditches that often result in emergency situations after they enter the water accidently. These situations can be extremely dangerous for anyone involved and requires a large rescue operation to recover them safely and under no circumstances should you attempt to rescue the animal yourself. In these situations, we use specialist rescue equipment to recover the animal safely without causing harm or distress to the animal. In these incidents, we always attend with a veterinary specialist to ensure the animals health and wellbeing is maintained throughout the situation. Any animal that finds themselves in a situation where they’re trapped, panic is often the first action displayed, therefore, it is imperative that everyone stands clear and no one approaches the animal. If you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.

General Advice for Cattle

Cattle are often heavy and dangerous animals that often find themselves in dangerous situations. Most cattle have excellent and secure paddocks or grounds to live their lives safely, however, many animals reside close to waterways and ditches that often result in emergency situations after they enter the water accidently. These situations can be extremely dangerous for anyone involved and each situation requires a large rescue operation to recover them safely. Under no circumstances should you attempt to rescue the animal yourself. We use specialist rescue equipment to recover the animal safely without causing harm or distress to the animal and In these incidents, we always attend with a veterinary specialist to ensure the animals health and wellbeing is maintained throughout the situation. Any animal that finds themselves in a situation where they’re trapped, panic is often the first action displayed, therefore, it is imperative that everyone stands clear and no one approaches the animal. If you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.

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Birds & Fledglings

Advice if you find a injured wild bird.
Wild Bird General Advice
Wild birds are everywhere here in the UK, with them nesting on rooftops, in trees, urban environments and rural fields, this means they’re always getting themselves into trouble on way or another. Pidgeon’s, Crows, sparrows and blue tits are but a few of the wild birds we are lucky to have here in the UK. Whilst most have adapted to their environment and the hazards that they face, they cannot always keep up with mankind’s developments. These birds often find themselves in situations ranging from entrapment in buildings, becoming stuck in netting, injuries involving motor vehicle incidents to almost becoming breakfast for the cats in the area! If you find any bird in distress, contact our team for further advice and the appropriate support when needed. When dealing with wild birds, it is imperative that you remember that all birds, nests and their eggs are protected by law and by removing a bird or egg from the nest is an offence under the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981. In emergency situations, you can remove the bird, egg or nest for the animal’s welfare. Before handling any bird, contact our team for further advice and guidance on how to deal with the animal in need. If you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.
Advice if you find a bird of prey that needs help.
Bird of Prey Advice
Birds of prey (hawks, falcons, owls etc.) are effective hunters, and possess an array of weaponry which has the potential to cause significant damage to humans. Powerful feet, sharp talons and strong beaks are easily capable of inflicting harm to human flesh and therefore caution should always be observed when dealing with these species. If you encounter an injured raptor, it is not recommended that you attempt to handle the bird unless you have appropriate equipment (e.g. thick gloves, eye protection). The best course of action is to contact your local wildlife rehabilitation centre and inform them of the location of the bird. If you do need to contain the bird yourself so as to prevent further injury to itself, then wear gloves, and keep control of the feet at all times – as these are the bird’s primary killing mechanism. Be aware some of our larger species of raptors are very powerful, and therefore you may require assistance from someone else to prevent the wings from being used. If you have a towel or sheet handy, then it’s a good idea to throw it over the bird before picking it up, and once captured it is recommended to cover its head. This will prevent the beak from being used to bite and also aids in minimising stress for the bird. As always, once a raptor is contained – it’s imperative that it is sent to your local rehab centre without delay.
What to do if you find a fledgling.
Fledgling Season Advice
As the spring rapidly approaches and the days get longer and brighter you will possibly have started to notice the birds beginning their flurry of activity to get ready for breeding season. You may even be lucky enough to have a nest or two taking shape in your own gardens! Unfortunately this also means that it is the beginning of orphan season, and we here at Fenland Animal Rescue are beginning our own flurry of activity to make sure we are ready for all the little nestlings coming our way.There are several reasons we are called out to rescue baby birds, and the first thing we do in every case in attempt to find the nest. Whilst we have a lot of experience and much success in raising nestlings, humans make a very poor substitute for a mother bird and there is unfortunately very little we can do to change this. For this reason, if it is at all possible we always make the effort to return the nestling to its nest where it has the very best chance at survival. If the nest cannot be found or accessed or the chick is injured then we will take them to one of our specialist rehabilitators who can give them the time and care they need.If you do find a baby bird fallen from the nest and cannot easily and safely return him please make sure the nestling is put somewhere dark, quiet and well ventilated, preferably with a hot water bottle wrapped in a towel to keep him warm. Please do not feed him until you have spoken to us, as a lot of species of birds eat different things and you may end up doing more harm than good, however well-meaning your intentions. Instead, give us a quick call and we can advise you over the phone on how you can best help. We, at Fenland Animal Rescue have specialist training and equipment to aid us in replacing the chick into the nest, and we are more than happy to take a trip out to you to do just that – in fact it’s one of the orphaned bird outcomes we prefer! So unless the nest is very easy to reach we urge you to contact us rather than risk injury to yourself or other birds.

Water Birds

With such a diverse array of wildlife in Cambridgeshire, it is no surprise that we are a frequent visiting site and home various small birds. Ducks, Grebes, Cormorants are but a few, yet all are equally as dangerous. When coming across these animals, you should immediately air caution when in close proximity to the animal. There have been many incidents in which people forget that these are wild animals and may not be all too friendly. Every small bird has the potential to cause serious harm to any individual and with all wildlife, they all revert to their ‘Fight or Flight’ instinct when they feel they’re in danger or anxious. Whilst most birds will flee when approached, some may choose to fight when cornered or threatened. During fledgling/orphan’s season, parenting birds will continuously protect their young and can be extremely protective of their young and should not be approached. If you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.

Other Wildlife

Small Wildlife Advice


With Cambridgeshire being a rural county, we have a diverse array of small wildlife living alongside us. Everything from hedgehogs and squirrels, to grass snakes and moles! It is inevitable that at one time or another, you will come into contact with these amazing animals, therefore, it is always useful to know what to do should you find one in distress. The first thing to remember is that these animals can often carry illness and disease as well as some animals have spikes, spines, claws and teeth that can all cause harm to yourself, therefore, we recommend that when handling wildlife, you take the precaution to wear gloves to prevent any harm coming to both yourself and the animal. Like all wildlife, handling them will cause stress to the animal and should only be done in emergency situations. Should you have concerns for any animals, it is best to contact ourselves or your local veterinary practice for further advice and support. If the animal is trapped, injured or in distress, stand by and call our emergency telephone line immediately for further advice and if necessary await our team’s arrival.

Large Wildlife Advice

The UK has several large species of wildlife and in Cambridgeshire, we are lucky to be home to most. These animals can be found in all environments and it is not uncommon to see them in your garden or highstreets from time to time. It’s often during these times, in which they manage to find themselves in situations that lead to injury or death. Foxes, Badgers and Deer are often victims to road traffic collisions and unfortunately, these are the most common encounters humans have with these animals. Should you find yourself in a situation involving a large species of wildlife, do not approach the animal as this will place yourself in danger and cause unnecessary stress towards the animal. During road traffic collisions with wildlife, you should contact our emergency telephone line and the local police immediately to report the incident. Do not stand in the carriage way and remain in a place of safety at all times. If you happen to find an animal trapped, whether it be a fox stuck in netting, a badger in a trap or a deer stuck in fencing, it is advised that no one approach the animal until our team arrives. These situations are already extremely stressful for the animal; therefore, your presence will only cause unnecessary stress to the animal throughout the ordeal. If you see an animal in distress, stand back, contact our emergency telephone line and await our team’s arrival.

Seasonal Advice

Seasonal Advice for Cats

Coming Soon!

Seasonal Advice for Dogs

Coming Soon!

Seasonal Advice for Water Birds

Coming Soon!

Seasonal Advice for Other Wildlife

Coming Soon!

Human Health & Safety

Fox Rescue
Advice for Staying Safe When Humans Encounter Wildlife

During any animal related incident, nothing is more important than the safety and welfare of all involved. Rescuing animals from hazardous situations requires training, specialist knowledge, specialist equipment and veterinary guidance to achieve the best outcome for the animal involved.

Should you find yourself involved with an animal related incident, it is always a natural instinct to rush in to help the animal in distress, However, it is crucial that you remain calm, stay at a distance and call for help immediately. In doing this, you prevent yourself become a casualty and stop the situation from worsening. It is important that should you find yourself on a live carriage way, that you remove yourself immediately to a place of safety and where possible, pre-warn oncoming traffic whilst ensuring your safety at all times. Incidents that may be in or around waterways, it is vital that you stand clear and under no circumstances should you enter the water or attempt a rescue yourself. These incidents often require a multi-agency response and medications may be required by a Veterinarian before the extraction of the animal in need.

Required Resources:
• Specialist Knowledge
• Specialist Equipment
• Understanding Animal Psychology
• Experienced Operatives
• Veterinary Assistance

It is important to remember that human safety should always come before the rescue. If human casualties are also on scene, it delays the rescue effort for the animal and human casualties will then become the priority. Our team regularly trains to ensure their skills, equipment and knowledge is action ready to assist any animal in need. We work alongside emergency services to ensure the best outcome for everyone involved, but most importantly to ensure the safe and secure rescue of the animal involved with minimal stress caused. Should you ever be in doubt, stand back and contact our emergency telephone line for further assistance or advice.

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